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Ribble Valley Borough Council

Government Praise for Refuse Collection Service

Published Wednesday 15th January 14

Ribble Valley Borough Council has been praised by the Government for its refuse collection service.

Eric Pickles, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, has called on councils across the country to follow Ribble Valley's lead by collecting refuse weekly.

He said refuse collection was the most visible service residents received for their council tax and they deserved a comprehensive service.

The Government's guidance on weekly refuse collections, or "bin bible," published this week, cites Ribble Valley Borough Council as an example of best practice.

Eric Pickles said: "Householders deserve a comprehensive weekly refuse collection service in return for their taxes and a number of local authorities are showing that innovative approaches can deliver quality services."

The document praises Ribble Valley Council for operating a weekly refuse collection service in one of the largest rural boroughs in the country, while maintaining a 90 per cent customer satisfaction rate.

Ribble Valley Borough Council leader Stuart Hirst said: "Ribble Valley Borough Council was one of the few local authorities in the UK to maintain a weekly refuse collection service, as well as developing a robust recycling scheme.

"Our residents tell us that they value and appreciate weekly collections of non-recyclable waste and we are delighted that the Government has recognised our achievements."

Ribble Valley Borough Council recycles nearly 40 per cent of the borough's domestic waste and recently expanded its doorstep recycling service to include food waste, such as fruit and vegetable peelings, seeds and apple cores, tea bags, coffee grounds and filter papers, paper towels or tissues (not if they have touched meat) and egg shells.