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Council Tackles Climate Change with 'Crimson Kings'

Ribble Valley Mayor Stella Brunskill has planted trees in Clitheroe and Longridge as part of the Woodland Trust’s Great Climate Fightback.
Ribble Valley Mayor Stella Brunskill has planted trees in Clitheroe and Longridge as part of the Woodland Trust’s Great Climate Fightback.
Published Friday, 29 November 2019

A Council is doing its bit to tackle climate change by planting trees in Clitheroe and Longridge.

Ribble Valley Borough Council has planted ‘Crimson Kings’ at Clitheroe Castle and Towneley Gardens, Longridge, as part of the Woodland Trust’s Big Climate Fightback.

The scheme will see 250,000 trees planted in the UK this Saturday (30 November), which is the start of the tree-planting season.

Trees absorb carbon, fight flooding, reduce pollution, nurture wildlife and make landscapes more resilient.

Ribble Valley Mayor Stella Brunskill said: “Trees are on the frontline of the fight against climate change: they absorb carbon dioxide, one of the principle greenhouse gases; provide oxygen, cool our cities, create havens for wildlife and offer opportunities to engage with the natural world.

“We are delighted to support the Big Climate Fightback and will be looking at ways to plant more trees in Ribble Valley in the future.”

Ribble Valley Borough Council is no newcomer to tree-planting. In 2014, it planted a dove tree in the grounds of Clitheroe Castle marking the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, alongside oak trees in each of the borough’s 40 parishes in memory of the fallen.

And it is committed to promoting further biodiversity and tree-planting in the borough.

Crimson Kings are stunning deciduous trees, with large five-lobed purple and crimson leaves during the summer.

 

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